Saturday, December 24, 2011

FAQ: Frequently Asked Questions!



A co-worker of mine gave me the idea for this post, while we were discussing how when we initially meet with a family or school we get asked variations of the same questions over and over. Of course, most people don't realize that the questions that come to their mind also come to alot of other peoples minds. I find it somewhat amusing and perfectly normal to get asked the same questions over and over.

I decided to make a brief list of the questions I get asked the most --complete with answers--when I meet with a family or a therapist for the first time. You might see a question or two that you remember asking the first ABA professional you worked with.

FAQ- Families
  1. "What is ABA anyway?": To summarize (because this can be a very short or very long response), "Behavior Analysis" is a behavioral science that researches the most effective ways to reduce or improve a variety of behaviors, such as aggression, communication, self-stimulatory behaviors, etc. "Applied Behavior Analysis" is taking these strongly research supported tools and strategies and applying them to everyday environments to help individuals function.
  2. "How much will all of this cost?": There is huge variability in this field when it comes to fees. Many factors effect rates such as location, number of hours per week, size of ABA team, is the program supervised by a BCBA, etc. I would say an average rate for an ABA therapist charges $15 per hour. Average rate for a BCBA is $60 per hour.  The average number of therapy hours needed each week would be between 25-30. Besides private pay, some parents get grants or scholarships from the state or private businesses,  get the school district to pay for ABA, or get reimbursement through their insurance companies to pay for ABA therapy.
  3. "When will this be over/How long will we have to do this?": This is not a question with a quick answer, but new clients ask me this all the time. Which I can completely understand a parent wanting to know when therapy will be done. Let me give you an example of why this is such a hard question to answer: If I start working with a child who is 2, nonverbal, and tantrumming every few hours, we will have lots of intensive goals to target. As that child makes progress and begins to improve in their functioning, could therapy stop? Yes. Do parents typically say "Okay she is talking now, we can stop this"? No. Almost no one says that. Parents then say "Well what about toilet training? What about feeding issues? Can you work on church attendance?", so then the program goals change and evolve into different areas. So I suppose my answer would be, whoever is paying for services can determine at what point therapy is "done".
  4. "Can you get my child to do _____/Can you get my child to stop doing ____?": The short answer is: Probably. ABA is a behavioral method, so anything that is a behavior can potentially be modified by ABA. This includes language, tying shoes, using the toilet, hugging a sister, doing homework, walking the family dog, kicking the cat, cursing, wandering away from the house, etc. If its a behavior then ABA can be used to teach/improve/or reduce it.
  5. "Can you just move into my home/Can we adopt you/Please don't ever leave!": Yes, people really say this to me! This is a completely understandable reaction to a successful treatment method that appears to work like "magic". However, it is my goal as an ABA professional to show a client that I am not a magician and I don't carry a wand in my purse. With proper training they can learn how to apply ABA techniques themselves That way they don't need me to move into their guest room :-) because they know how to do what I do.
  6. "My husband/wife will never follow this.": This is basically a consistency issue. When I meet with one parent and they tell me immediately how the other parent is against ABA, or not fully on board, I explain how critical consistency is to success.  Limited consistency equals limited success. Part of ongoing parent training is emphasizing the need for a team approach and getting everyone on the same page.
  7. " I really think my wife/husband/parent has Autism too!": Statistically, there is somewhat of a genetic link to Autism. It isn't unusual that an uncle, grandparent, or parent is somewhere on the Spectrum or has some other neurological disorder. The great thing about what I do is by teaching parents how to challenge and support their child with Autism, I also am giving them strategies on how to deal with their spouse/family member with Autism.
  8. "Have you ever cured a child from Autism/Have you ever fixed a child using ABA?":  I don't use words such as "cure" or "fix", because my focus is on improvement. What ABA does is help correct deficits, teach skills, and push these children to reach their full potential. Each child's ability to progress during ABA therapy has a lot of influencing factors including: severity of diagnosis, age child began therapy, how intensive was the therapy, the quality of the therapy staff, etc.
  9. "My child currently receives ABA therapy at home. I am considering ___ therapy. Which therapy is the best/Which therapy should I pick/Which therapy should I stop doing?": What I would suggest to any parent considering a new therapy or wanting to end a current therapy is look at your child's individual needs. What deficits do they have? What strengths do they have? Focus on therapeutic methods designed to address your child's needs. Look for methods that are empirically supported (research showing the method is effective) across a variety of settings or individuals. Look for methods that include the parents in therapy, and also address behavioral issues. I often see new therapy methods that become very popular but if the child has challenging behavioral issues then they cant participate. If a professional expects to teach a child with Autism, then encountering challenging behaviors is quite likely.

 
FAQ- Therapists


  1. "How did you get into this field/How can I get into this field?": I explain this a little bit in my Bio, but I stumbled into my career. I didn't plan on ABA as a career when I entered college and I had no knowledge of Autism. In my freshman year of college I started working part time as an ABA therapist and I "caught the bug". I felt like I had the most interesting, amazing job in the world.  I decided I wanted ABA to be my career and not just a PT job, so I began the necessary steps towards becoming a BCBA. If you are interested in ABA as a career I recommend contacting agencies and companies that provide ABA services. I would suggest an agency rather than a family because with an agency you will be provided with training and multiple clients to work with rather than just one client. This field has a massive demand for fun, energetic professionals, so if you think you want to be a Superhero  then I welcome you!
  2. "How much do ABA therapists make?": There is great variability as far as pay depending on your location, if you work for a family vs. an agency, your education and experience, etc. I would estimate that ABA therapists can make anywhere from $12-$20 per hour. BCBA's, Lead Therapists, or Consultants can make anywhere from $25-$60 per hour.
  3. "What is the best/worst company to work for?": Like many ABA therapists, I have worked for different agencies, companies, and schools. There is a high turnover rate in this field. There is no "best or worst" place to work. Any company or agency will have its pros and cons. Decide what is most important to you as an employee and select agencies that have those characteristics. For example, are you comfortable working at a large company with hundreds of employees or do you want to work for a small agency where everyone knows each other? Do you want to work within your local area or do you want to travel to see your clients? Do you want to work with young kids or with adults? Find an agency that has the characteristics important to you, and who respects and values their employees.
  4. "How do you handle rude/resistant/confrontational parents?": Conflicts with parents can happen, and they do happen. Usually there are a ton of internal things happening with that parent, and unfortunately the person they choose to take it out on is you. Another factor that can lead to conflict is many parents of these children also have Autism or some neurological disorder. I have encountered families where the child has Autism, and the parent has Aspergers, or Depression. Dealing with a parent who has an untreated mental disorder is definitely tough. Try to take your feelings out of it and think about what that family may be going through. Talk to the family, explain why you are feeling uncomfortable, and try to resolve the problem. It isn't necessary for the parent to like you for you to do your job, but it is necessary that they respect you and can maintain a professional relationship. If not, you should stop working with that family.
  5. "I have been doing this for X amount of time. Why cant I get hired as a Lead Therapist/How do I get promoted?": This field is unique as far as experience and know-how.  The more children you work with, the more you need to learn and grow and be comfortable with change. Some people describe it like this: "If you've met one child with Autism, then you've met ONE child with Autism".  These kids are all unique individuals and they differ greatly from one another. This field is also rapidly advanced by research and technology, and what was done 5 years ago isn't necessarily done today. When I first started in this field, the technology that can be incorporated into an ABA session today was unheard of. As technology changes, I have to grow and change with it to better serve my clients. I have to stay flexible and be willing to learn and try new things, because what works for "Amy" might not work for "Tanisha". That is what can be so fascinating about this job, but its also what drives some people crazy about this job. For these reasons, I don't think getting certain degrees or a certain amount of experience means you are automatically qualified to lead, manage, or oversee an ABA program. What I have found is that more innate qualities, such as patience, flexibility, creativity, and leadership skills, are what make a great Lead Therapist or Supervising Therapist. 

FAQ Part II
FAQ Part III

16 comments:

  1. Hi, I just wanted to say I love your blog! I just discovered it earlier today in my search for all things ABA. I am starting my new job as an ABA skills trainer on Tuesday and am so, so excited! I have a degree in psychology and have worked with children, including those with developmental disabilities, in various settings but never before in ABA. Your blog has given me some great insight into the world I'm about to enter, thank you!!

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  2. So glad you enjoy the blog, thank you! Welcome to the field of ABA, and please feel free to continue posting or asking questions about particular topics :-)

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  3. I am currently going to school for early childhood development and am very interested in going on to get my BCBA. I have been feeling discouraged lately but after reading your blog I feel so much better!! Thank You!!!!!

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    1. You're welcome :-) I think if you are considering obtaining Board Certification you should definitely go for it! There is a huge demand for passionate and caring BCBA's.

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  4. Hello, I am interested in ABA but I see a lot of connection with autism. Is ABA's main focus autism, or can this therapy be provided for at risk kids/ other mental illnesses?

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    1. Hi there,

      There is actually a good portion of Behavior Analysts who do not like how ABA has become synonymous with "Autism". I'm in an ABA chat group on Facebook and there are BCBAs in there who work with DD adults, individuals with TBI, senior citizens, in the business world, they are researchers, etc. What ABA can do is broad and diverse. Unfortunately, in many states the funding sources dictate what BCBAs can and cannot do.
      If a parent cant get funding for ABA without a diagnosis, then they are likely to think ABA is just a "special needs thing". But it really is not. Its just the decision makers tend to only pay for services if there is some type of diagnosis, particularly if that diagnosis is Autism.

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  5. Hi there,

    Thank you so much for sharing so much of everything you know with us. I am currently in graduate school, getting my master's in psychology with a concentration in aba. I was told I could start obtaining my hours and I have reached out to different agencies. I actually landed an interview friday and wanted to know what you think I should know pre-interview. I am new to this field and do know too much about aba since I am currently taking my first aba class. Can you help please? I am more than willing to learn as much as possible.

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  6. Hi & Thanks for checking out the blog :-)

    Good luck on your interview, and I do have a post about what ABA Therapists should look for in a work position. I think it would be helpful for you. Here is a link:

    http://www.iloveaba.com/2012/03/interview-other-side.html

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  7. Every site I've ever seen says that the average salary for a Bcba is about 53k. Is this true. I have never herd of a Bcba making less than 50k. I'm planning on starting a program here soon and am trying to figure how much people actually get paid.

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    1. This will vary depending on many factors: your area, funding sources, will you work as an employee or contractor, part time or salaried, etc. Variability can be all over the place, even in the same city.
      I know that APBA (here is a link: http://www.apbahome.net) publishes information about BCBA salary range across the country, but I think you have to join APBA to access it.

      In my area, I was offered a full time BCBA position that started at around $33K or so.....so its absolutely possible to be a BCBA and not be paid well. This is typically a high paying job, but there's always exceptions to any rule.

      Your best bet is to speak with people in your area who work in the sector you plan to enter (school based, clinic based, etc), and get an idea of what a competitive rate is for your area.

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  8. Thank you for explaining ABA. I'm new to the field and love it. I have a question about my supervisor. My supervisor is supposed to provide certain amount of hours in supervision but she never shows up or contacts me. I've only been in the field 2 years and I'm still learning. The other company I worked for I got close supervision so this is different for me. In general, can my supervisor bill for time she's not providing any guidance. God knows I feel that I need it. My client's mom has asked the owner of the company because she is also not getting parent training hours that are in the contract. Is this legal in our profession? In other professions people have to show up to bill, are we able to bill for services not provided? I'm very excited about learning more and am working toward my BCBA. Thank you for taking the time.

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    1. Sorry to hear about the situation you are in, that is very unfortunate. Nothing about hat you are describing is good clinical practice, or even professional behavior. No, individuals cannot bill insurance for time they did not actually work. That is insurance fraud, and it is illegal. I don't know from the info you provide if some non face-to-face time is billable (some insurance companies allow for this), but even if it is, you should still be seeing your supervisor on a regular basis. There should not be a situation where they "never show up", that is extremely unethical behavior.

      Speak to your supervisor and/or the company owner first, you always want to try to go up the chain of command. If that does not bring about resolution, you can report the BCBA for unethical professional conduct on www.bacb.com

      I also do not recommend working for a company that is okay with you being provided with 0 case supervision...that is very much not okay.

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  9. I was offered a position as a BCBA consultant in a school for a few hours a week. I currently work for an agency and have a pretty full case load with nice hourly pay. I was wondering how much do you think I can ask for as a BCBA consultant in a school? I wonder if it will be worth my time to work some hours in the school...

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    1. Hi and thanks for commenting,

      My first question would be are you sure you have the room in your schedule to do both? When consulting with school systems, things such as attending meetings, conducting observations, or meeting with administrators can be required on top of the consultant hours you provide.

      As far as pay, that is never simple to determine. There are so many factors that must be considered. I assume this would be a contract position? If so, you have a bit more wiggle room to negotiate pay. You will need to be knowledgeable of the going rate in your area for similar positions. For example, if in your area school BCBA's with an employee status usually make $45 per hour, then you should expect to make more than that for a contract position.
      You also have to consider drive time/commute, benefits/lack of benefits, supplies and materials, does the position terminate at the end of the school year, etc. Like I said, lots of variables. All of these factors will help you determine the pay you should ask for, or be prepared to negotiate.

      Good luck!

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  10. Hi you mentioned Lead Therapists, or Consultants can make anywhere from $25-$60 per hour. I was wondering where you got those facts from; was it research-based or experience-based?

    I'm trying to do research and I can't seem to find anything on how much a senior ABA therapist with a masters degree should be making (as a contractor).

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    1. Thanks for commenting!

      The APBA (Association of Professional Behavior Analysis) published a survey in 2009 related to job placement in our field. Topics covered included population served, years practicing as a BCBA, and average income. That may be a good resource for you, try an internet search for "APBA Professional Employment 2009". Or, you can look up the publication on their website.

      My estimated rates are based on my experiences and my area...I wouldn't know the going rate across various states or outside of the US. Rates will vary based on location, certification status, and available funding sources.

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